Comment on the Equality and Human Rights Commission inquirity into home care of older people

Posted in News on 24th July 2012

21 November 2011

Nick Sanderson, Chairman of the Association of Retirement Villages and CEO of Audley Retirement Villages, said:

“The final report from the Equality and Human Rights Commission is a damning indictment of how care is provided to the elderly. It is outrageous that with age and increased care need comes risk that your basic human rights could be compromised. There has to be a step change in how we provide for old age. Firstly, we need greater consideration of the alternative housing options available including those that provide fully flexible care, in the home, and are proven to delay the need for institutional care. At the same time, government must work with industry bodies including the Association for Retirement Village Operators, to improve regulation of the sector.”

The Equality and Human Rights Commission will publish their final report into Home Care of Older People on 22 November 2011. The full report is available here.

Earlier this year, the International Longevity Centre published research into the Impact of Extra Care Housing based on longitudinal data from more than 4,000 residents. Extra Care housing is defined as accommodation designed for older people that includes access to flexible, onsite care.

Key findings include:

Residents in Extra Care housing are less than half as likely to enter institutional accommodation after five years of residence than those in standard housing (8 per cent as compared to 19 per cent of those a matched demographic living in the community).

Residents in Extra Care housing are less likely to be admitted into a hospital for an overnight stay as someone of a matched demographic living in the community.

Those living in Extra Care housing are less likely to fall. This is a significant benefit when falls are the leading cause of death through injury for those over 75. Nearly 4 million people aged 60 and over have fallen in the last two years, with every older person who falls and has to go to hospital costing the UK taxpayer approximately £2,500*.